Intracellular Bacteria Cause Inflammatory Diseases

By Meg Mangin

In April 1997, the National Institutes of Health published this statement: “A considerable body of experimental and clinical evidence supports the concept that difficult-to-culture and dormant bacteria are involved in latency of infection and that these persistent bacteria may be pathogenic.” See Bacterial persistence and expression of disease In July 2006, the Centers for Disease…

Intracellular Bacterial Macrophage Stimulation May Cause Non-Resolving Inflammation

By Meg Mangin

Macrophages are a critical part of the body’s defense against microorganisms. They eat and destroy pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses and fungi. The macrophage, one of the most complex and diverse chemical factories in the body, has the ability to manufacture over 100 powerful chemicals ranging from cytokines and hormones to enzymes and prostaglandins. Macrophage…

Vitamin D ‘Deficiency’ – Bacterial Etiology

By Meg Mangin

Vitamin D proponents use a disease deficiency model to explain low levels of 25(OH)D. Their hypothesis states low 25(OH)D causes chronic diseases; however, a pathogenesis has not been elucidated. Low serum 25(OH)D in the presence of disease can also be explained with a dysregulated vitamin D metabolism model. This hypothesis proposes that low vitamin D…

Bacterial Etiology of Sarcoidosis

By Meg Mangin

Live bacteria have been found, with significant frequency of occurrence, in sarcoid tissue. They’re of a variety called Cell Wall Deficient (CWD), or L-Forms, or coccoid forms. They’ve adapted due to a resistance to the penicillin antibiotics, which attack bacterial cell walls. See History of Research into Cell Wall Deficient Bacteria (L-Forms). These bacteria are…

Intracellular Bacteria

By Meg Mangin

In April 1997, the National Institutes of Health published this statement:“A considerable body of experimental and clinical evidence supports the concept that difficult-to-culture and dormant bacteria are involved in latency of infection and that these persistent bacteria may be pathogenic.”See Bacterial persistence and expression of disease In July 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and…